Dental Emergencies

  1. If you are experiencing a dental or medical emergency that you believe may be life-threatening, call 911 or contact the nearest hospital emergency room for assistance.
  2. If you are an existing patient of Sunrise Dental, please go to the Locations Tab and contact the Sunrise office where you have been seen for regular patient care and call them directly.
  3. If you have never been seen by Sunrise Dental, please contact one of our offices listed on the Locations Tab and we will schedule you during regular working hours.

Common Dental Emergencies

Toothache

Toothaches can be caused by many different reasons including cavities, periodontal disease, trauma and hot & cold food and drinks. If you experience a toothache, please try the following:

  • C‌lean the area around the sore tooth thoroughly with a toothbrush and toothpaste.
  • Rinse the mouth vigorously with warm salt water or use dental floss to dislodge any trapped food or debris.
  • DO NOT place aspirin on the gum or on the aching tooth.
  • If there is any swelling, apply a cold compress to the outside of the mouth. Schedule an appointment with a dentist as soon as possible.

 

Broken/Fractured Tooth or Filling Falls Out

The mouth is a harsh environment that is always being exposed to bacteria, corrosive liquids, and hard foods that can cause damage to the oral anatomy. Occasionally, we have patients that have broken off a piece of their tooth, put a crack in their tooth or a filling has fallen out. If you experience any of these conditions, please do the following:

  • Rinse the mouth with warm salt water and spit out the contents to make sure that you do not swallow any sharp tooth or filling debris.
  • Locate and save any broken tooth fragments.
  • If there is any swelling, apply a cold compress to the outside of the mouth.
  • Avoid spicy or salty foods since they may irritate the affected area.
  • Additionally, if you must eat before you have a chance to see the dentist, stick to soft foods and soups (not too hot).
  • Schedule an appointment with a dentist as soon as possible.

 

Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip, or Cheek

Minor cuts or bites occur to every individual from time to time and generally heal within a few days. If you experience a minor cut or bite, please try the following:

  • Apply ice to bruised areas.
  • If there is bleeding, apply firm but gentle pressure with a clean gauze or cloth.
  • If bleeding does not stop after 15 minutes or it cannot be controlled by simple pressure, go to the nearest hospital for treatment.
  • Avoid spicy or salty foods since they may irritate the affected area.
  • Schedule an appointment with a dentist if you have any concerns

 

Bleeding After Baby Tooth Falls Out

It is completely normal for there to be minor bleeding when a baby tooth falls out of a child’s mouth. Typically there are sharp edges on the tooth, the adult tooth is trying to come into its space and many times children are wiggling their teeth with their fingers or foreign objects. Typically any minor bleeding should stop fairly quickly, however you can take these steps to minimize any concerns:

  • Rinse the mouth with warm salt water and spit out the contents to make sure that the child does not swallow any pieces of the tooth.
  • Fold and pack a clean gauze or cloth over the bleeding area.
  • Have the child bite on the gauze with pressure for 15 minutes. This may be repeated more than once.
  • If bleeding won’t stop or seems to be too much contact a dentist.

 

Knocked Out Permanent Tooth

See a dentist as IMMEDIATELY as possible! Time is a critical factor in saving the tooth.

Unfortunately permanent teeth can be knocked out, typically due to trauma. Teeth are living structures; therefore it is very important to act quickly when a tooth has been dislodged. Please follow these steps if you have this experience:

  1. Find the tooth. Handle the tooth by the top (crown), not the root portion that is typically under the gums. The root portion is very sensitive to germs and bacteria.
  2. You may rinse the tooth with warm (not hot or cold) water to remove any foreign debris, but DO NOT clean or handle the tooth unnecessarily.
  3. If possible try to reinsert it in its socket. Have the patient hold the tooth in place by biting on a clean gauze or cloth. Do not check the tooth, but keep the mouth closed as long as possible maintaining slight pressure to keep the tooth in the socket.
  4. If you cannot reinsert the tooth, transport the tooth in a cup containing milk or water. This prevents the tooth and any other dental anatomy from drying out.
  5. Please remember, only a qualified dentist can determine if a tooth can be saved.

 

Cold Sores / Canker Sores

Many patients occasionally suffer from “cold” or “canker” sores. These sores can be caused from stress, minor trauma to the mouth or if you have been exposed to a virus. If you experience one of these sores, you can try these steps to relieve any discomfort:

  • Avoid spicy or salty foods since they may irritate the affected area.
  • Try one of the many over-the-counter medications. If you are unsure of which one, consult a dentist or pharmacist.
  • Because some serious diseases may begin as sores, it is important to have a dental evaluation if these sores persist for more than a few days or re-appear regularly.
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